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The impact of the revolt of american colonists against great britain on todays usa

It is impossible to know the exact number of American colonists who favored or opposed independence. For years it was widely believed that one third favored the Revolution, one third opposed it, and one third were undecided.

Library of Congress

This stems from an estimate made by John Adams in his personal writings in 1815. Historians have since concluded that Adams was referring to American attitudes toward the French Revolution, not ours. The current thought is that about 20 percent of the colonists were Loyalists — those whose remained loyal to England and King George.

Another small group in terms of percentage were the dedicated patriots, for whom there was no alternative but independence. On the Fence Often overlooked are the fence-sitters who made up the largest group. With so many Americans undecided, the war became in great measure a battle to win popular support.

If the patriots could succeed in selling their ideas of revolution to the public, then popular support might follow and the British would be doomed. In " Common Sense ," Thomas Paine argued for independence from Britain and the creation of a democratic republic.

Its publication in January 1776 immediately added fuel to the patriots' cause. Even with military victory, it would have been impossible for the Crown to regain the allegiance of the people. Revolution would merely flare up at a later date. The British understood the need to attract American popular support for the parent country, as well.

  1. By the mid-1770s, relations between Americans and the British administration had become strained and acrimonious.
  2. In the end, many Loyalists simply left America.
  3. At first, the British generally had their way because of their far superior sea power. Families were sometimes divided over the revolution.
  4. The Sun never shined on a cause of greater worth.
  5. In the long run, however, the patriots were much more successful attracting support.

Some colonists who were not persuaded by the political struggle joined the British for personal gain or military glory. Some joined out of sheer loyalty to the Crown — they still believed themselves loyal British citizens. There were also many American farmers willing to sell their goods to the British for profit.

In the long run, however, the patriots were much more successful attracting support. American patriots won the war of propaganda. Committees of Correspondence persuaded many fence-sitters to join the patriot cause. Excerpt of "Common Sense" IN the following pages I offer nothing more than simple facts, plain arguments, and common sense: The Sun never shined on a cause of greater worth.

11b. Loyalists, Fence-sitters, and Patriots

Now is the seed-time of Continental union, faith and honour. The least fracture now will be like a name engraved with the point of a pin on the tender rind of a young oak; the wound would enlarge with the tree, and posterity read in it full grown characters.

  • The majority of Americans remained undecided but watching and waiting;
  • For years it was widely believed that one third favored the Revolution, one third opposed it, and one third were undecided;
  • At first, the British generally had their way because of their far superior sea power;
  • On the Fence Often overlooked are the fence-sitters who made up the largest group;
  • Washington's first task, when he arrived in Boston to take charge of the ragtag militia assembled there, was to create an army in fact.

William Franklin, pictured here, a Loyalist, rarely, if ever, spoke to his Patriot father Ben after the war. Patriots subjected Loyalists to public humiliation and violence. Many Loyalists found their property vandalized, looted, and burned. The patriots controlled public discourse.

Woe to the citizen who publicly proclaimed sympathy to Britain. Families were sometimes divided over the revolution. What Happened to the Loyalists? In the end, many Loyalists simply left America. About 80,000 of them fled to Canada or Britain during or just after the war.

  • Its publication in January 1776 immediately added fuel to the patriots' cause;
  • When the British arrived in Lexington, however, colonial militia awaited them.

Because Loyalists were often wealthy, educated, older, and Anglican, the American social fabric was altered by their departure.

American history brands them as traitors. But most were just trying to maintain the lifestyles to which they had become accustomed. After all, history is always written by the winners. A Loyalist Pamphlet Loyalists, too, had their eloquent writers. Betsy Ross and the American Flag Betsy Ross, credited with sewing the first American flag, is one of the foremost female patriots. This site has a biography, a virtual tour of her house, directions for making a five-pointed star, and much more.

Don't miss the American flag photo gallery or the timeline. Take some time to enjoy this jam-packed website from ushistory.