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The importance of the discovery of the dead sea scroll in archaeology

A 1951 image of the Hebrew University's Prof. Eleazar Sukenik with one of the Dead Sea Scrolls. What are the most important finds of Israeli archaeology? From Dead Sea Scrolls to space-age tech, the dramatic history of the ever-developing field is indelibly entwined with that of the nation itself By Amanda Borschel-Dan 19 April 2018, 7: Even as the United Nations voted to end British Mandatory rule and establish two states — Jewish and Arab — in Palestine, the founder of Jewish archaeology in the Land of Israel held in his hands one of the greatest historical treasures of all time: In his journal that evening, Prof.

I do not dare to write down what I think of it.

Hebrew University Archaeologists Find 12th Dead Sea Scrolls Cave

Eleazar Sukenik, the first archaeologist to understand the importance of the scraps of parchment which became known as the Dead Sea Scrolls. After careful study, he held a press conference to share his initial findings in the Jewish Agency building in the middle of war-torn Jerusalem.

An American correspondent fainted in the street on the way, and had to be carried in by his colleagues. Though the jewel in the crown of Israeli archaeology, the Dead Sea Scrolls are just one piece of an ancient puzzle researchers are deciphering as they revisit the past to paint a clearer picture of those who walked the land well before the founding of the Jewish state. Ahead of the 70th anniversary of the State of Israel, The Times of Israel asked leading archaeologists what they view as the most important finds or developments in the field of Israeli archaeology — and why.

The groundbreaking researcher is the granddaughter of pioneering Israeli archaeologist Benjamin Mazar, a former president of the university, who led what is arguably the most significant excavation of a biblical site in Israel: Maeir goes one step further. Among the institutions promoting this interdisciplinary method of archaeological study is Tel Aviv University, which houses archaeozoology, archaeobotany, petrography and metallurgy laboratories.

  1. Based on various dating methods, including carbon 14, paleographic and scribal, the Dead Sea Scrolls were written during the period from about 200 B.
  2. This is in contrast to other non-biblical texts, where discrepancies on the interpretation of the Scripture persisted among different groups.
  3. This has been appropriately called the "Temple Scroll.
  4. JPG Parchment when removed from jug http.

Leading Tel Aviv University Prof. Israel Finkelstein predicts the field will continue to move in this high-tech, interdisciplinary direction.

One of his teams from Tel Aviv University recently used multispectral imaging and discovered never-before-seen Hebrew inscriptions on a First Temple-era shard using a modified household digital camera and a revolutionary new technique. Erez Ben-Yosef and Dr. Naama Sukenik examining fragments of colored textiles recovered at Timna.

The scrolls in context

For example, she and her team discovered pollen from the citron fruit in a private garden in Jerusalem which dates back to the First Temple period. Dafna Langgut is the head of the archaeobotany lab at Tel Aviv University. Knowing what killed our ancestors can illuminate their lives as well. This includes what ancient cultures ate and how they cultivated their food. Much ink has been spilled on a passionate ongoing conversation surrounding the historical accuracy of the Bible.

Argonauter, CC-BY-SA, via wikipedia Finkelstein is one of several scholars in contemporary archaeology who are taking the Bible not as a blueprint but rather as one of several local sources of information. Yosef Garfinkel, head of the Institute of Archaeology at Hebrew University, told The Times of Israel when asked his opinion on the important finds and developments of the past 70 years.

Dead Sea Scrolls History: Why The Latest Discovery Is The Most Important In 60 Years

The most recent among them was a clay seal impression bearing what could be the name of the Prophet Isaiah, discovered by Mazar in her recently renewed Jerusalem excavations. Garfinkel gives The Times of Israel several other examples of archaeological evidence in support of the biblical narrative.

The fortified city of Khirbet Qeiyafa, that indicates urban society in Judah at the time of King David, according to Prof. Yosef Garfinkel While not naming the fabled king specifically, according to the Biblical Archaeology Reviewit does recount the victory of an Aramean king over his two southern neighbors: The place of discovery of the most famous fruit of Israeli archaeology, the Dead Sea Scrolls, actually lies outside the border of the State of Israel.

Jodi Magness in an email exchange with The Times of Israel.

What is the importance of the Dead Sea Scrolls?

University of North Carolina archaeologist Jodi Magness. A fish swallows an Egyptian soldier in a mosaic scene depicting the splitting of the Red Sea from the Exodus story, from the 5th-century synagogue at Huqoq, in northern Israel.

  1. Cave 4 sheltered the main deposit of what some believe to have been an Essene library, which contained approximately 400 manuscripts, generally in poor condition. Archaeologists who probed the cave only saw blank scroll jars, a cloth and a leather strap used for wrapping and holding the scrolls.
  2. Some of his goats were climbing too high up the cliffs. The groundbreaking researcher is the granddaughter of pioneering Israeli archaeologist Benjamin Mazar, a former president of the university, who led what is arguably the most significant excavation of a biblical site in Israel.
  3. Much ink has been spilled on a passionate ongoing conversation surrounding the historical accuracy of the Bible. There were three individuals in the Old Testament writings that were referred to as "my anointed ones"—the prophet, the priest and the king refer to Ex.
  4. Jodi Magness in an email exchange with The Times of Israel. They are helpful in understanding the conditions from which rabbinic Judaism and early Christianity bloomed, this despite no rabbinic or Christian texts being discovered from the bunch of manuscripts.
  5. Many disputes of that period, including those on religious calendar and issues relating to Temple and priesthood, can be extracted from the scroll texts. Knowing what killed our ancestors can illuminate their lives as well.

For some, this, and the fact that it is administered by Elad, an organization which promotes a Jewish connection to Jerusalem, even in traditionally Arab neighborhoods, mires the historical heritage site in political controversy. Only then did ancient portions of Jerusalem become available for scientific research.

Bahat has a pending petition to the High Court to stop its construction. Joe Uziel and Dr. It is the first rediscovered example of a Roman public building in Jerusalem, the archaeologists said at a subterranean press conference last summer.