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Preventing hiv transmission from mother to child

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Preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV 24 October 2016 Over the past five years, there has been a rapid scale-up of services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

Antiretroviral medicines have averted 1.

  1. There has also been a dramatic reduction in AIDS-related paediatric deaths.
  2. They joined the 17. Preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV 24 October 2016 Over the past five years, there has been a rapid scale-up of services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.
  3. Since mortality among untreated infants is highest in the first three months of life, prompt diagnosis and linkage to treatment are crucial. Programmes to help women avoid HIV infection remain underdeveloped and fragile, leading to 900 000 new HIV infections among women over the age of 15 years in 2015.

There has also been a dramatic reduction in AIDS-related paediatric deaths. However, this welcome news is tempered by some complex remaining challenges. In 2015, there were 1. In some high-burden countries, such as Angola, Chad and Nigeria, less than half the pregnant or breastfeeding women living with HIV are receiving antiretroviral medicines.

Programmes to help women avoid HIV infection remain underdeveloped and fragile, leading to 900 000 new HIV infections among women over the age of 15 years in 2015.

Mother-to-child transmission

They joined the 17. Programmes to help women living with HIV avoid unintended pregnancies also remain inadequate: The World Health Organization WHO now recommends treating everyone living with HIV, but it is also essential to maintain good adherence to antiretroviral medicines in order to ensure their efficacy. However, many women gradually stop taking the medicines after the baby is born, increasing the risk of transmission during breastfeeding and placing their own health in jeopardy.

  1. The World Health Organization WHO now recommends treating everyone living with HIV, but it is also essential to maintain good adherence to antiretroviral medicines in order to ensure their efficacy. Preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV 24 October 2016 Over the past five years, there has been a rapid scale-up of services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.
  2. In Malawi, a study showed that a third of 7500 pregnant or breastfeeding women did not adhere to antiretroviral therapy adequately, compromising the benefits of treatment and increasing their risk of developing drug resistance. Preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV 24 October 2016 Over the past five years, there has been a rapid scale-up of services to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.
  3. In 2015, there were 1. Start Free, Stay Free, AIDS Free promotes concerted and coordinated country-led action designed to close the remaining HIV prevention and treatment gap for children, adolescent women and expectant mothers.

In Malawi, a study showed that a third of 7500 pregnant or breastfeeding women did not adhere to antiretroviral therapy adequately, compromising the benefits of treatment and increasing their risk of developing drug resistance. Access to diagnosis and treatment among children has improved, but much remains to be done. Among the 21 Global Plan priority countries, only half the children exposed to HIV received virological testing within two months of birth, as recommended by WHO.

Since mortality among untreated infants is highest in the first three months of life, prompt diagnosis and linkage to treatment are crucial. This signals service delivery failure for children. With the goal of ending paediatric AIDS, this framework embraces the aspiration that every child should be born and remain HIV-free start freeevery adolescent and young woman should be able to protect themselves from HIV stay free and every child and adolescent living with HIV should have access to quality HIV treatment, care and support AIDS-free.

It also aims to reduce new HIV infections among adolescents to under 100 000 and for 1.

Mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Start Free, Stay Free, AIDS Free promotes concerted and coordinated country-led action designed to close the remaining HIV prevention and treatment gap for children, adolescent women and expectant mothers. Its success will depend on tailor-made acceleration and implementation plans to respond to the country context, building on successful strategies to strengthen systems where necessary and identifying critical opportunities and actions to expand access to life-saving HIV treatment and prevention services.

To support implementation, the framework also calls on industry, civil society and international partners to focus on investing in efficient and cost-effective solutions that maximize programme outcomes.